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Dance Australia

July-August-September 2021

Dance Australia is the most respected dance journal in the country. The articles and reviews are written by the cream of Australia’s dance journalists. The beautiful photographs and glossy design make the magazine a work of art in itself –a keepsake for anyone who loves dance.

Country:
Australia
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yaffa Publishing Group PTY LTD
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$9.99 per month after trial

in this issue

2 min
where are the male dancers?

ONE boy in a class of girls – it’s a common sight in dance schools, and particularly ballet schools. One lonely soul in a sea of girls. It’s no secret that very few boys take up ballet. Those boys that do take up ballet often don’t stick it out for long, such are the odds stacked against them. Despite our modern-day, supposedly more enlightened attitudes to masculinity, boys who dance are still viewed as odd in Anglo-Australian society. (Unlike our First Nations people, for whom dance is embedded in their culture.) This situation has existed for so long that we have come to expect it and – I fear – to accept it. My own observation is that the percentage of boys studying ballet is at most 10 per cent. The…

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1 min
still locking them up

Marrugeku’s Bhenji Ra, Emmanuel James Brown, Miranda Wheen, Zachary Lopez, Chandler Connell, Feras Shaheen, Issa el Assaad, Luke Currie-Richardson & Ses Bero in Jurrungu Ngan-ga in a scene from Jurrungu Ngan-ga. MARRUGEKU is turning the spotlight on Australia’s approach to locking people up, in a visceral, turbo-charged new dance work. Called Jurrungu Ngan-ga [Straight Talk], the new creation “examines the common thread that connects outrageous levels of Indigenous incarceration to the indefinite detaining of asylum seekers”. Three years in development between Marrugeku’s twin homes of Broome and Sydney, this dance theatre creation is inspired by perspectives on incarceration shared by Yawuru leader Senator Patrick Dodson, Kurdish-Iranian writer and former Manus Island detainee Behrouz Boochani and philosopher Omid Tofighian. Marrugeku Co-Artistic Directors Dalisa Pigram and Rachael Swain say that Jurrungu Ngan-ga is a searing,…

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1 min
good news for co3

CO3, Perth’s contemporary dance company, has secured significant financial support for its Commission Fund. Established in May, 2021, the Commission Fund directly supports Co3’s Pathways Program IN RESIDENCE, which provides a $50,000 choreographic commission to one mid-career WA artist for a mainstage work for the company’s annual artistic program. The Wright Burt Foundation has generously committed to supporting the Pathways Program with a contribution of $150,000 over three years. IN RESIDENCE is curated by Co3’s artistic director, Raewyn Hill, and is applied for by invitation only. However, it is part of the company’s larger Pathways Program, comprising IN HOUSE and IN STUDIO, for which artists can apply. IN STUDIO provides recipients with 100 hours of free studio space; IN RESIDENCE provides recipients with $2000 each plus 40 hours of free studio space. Artists…

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1 min
8 x one = dancex

DANCE companies from around Australia will come together at Arts Centre Melbourne in September to perform in a unique festival conceived and curated by the Australian Ballet’s Artistic Director David Hallberg. Called DanceX, the festival will comprise eight companies – The Australian Ballet, Bangarra Dance Theatre, Sydney Dance Company, Chunky Move, Lucy Guerin Inc, Australian Dance Theatre, Queensland Ballet and West Australian Ballet. Each will perform the repertoire of their choice in four shows over two programs from September 24 to 27 and September 30 to October 2. DanceX will present a unique opportunity to experience the nation’s top classical and contemporary dance companies performing selected works which showcase the depth and diversity of the artform in Australia. This new venture signals Hallberg’s determination to engage with Australian audiences and the dance…

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1 min
am i covered?

Q If my studio already has Liability and Professional Indemnity, why should I consider a Group Accident policy? A: A public liability policy protects the studio (including its teachers, students, volunteers, and officials) against claims or allegations of negligence which caused or contributed to a person’s injury or damage to their property. It will cover the court and legal proceedings to defend the studio if a third party decides to sue them for their injury or damaged property. Should the Studio be found liable, the policy will also respond to pay the compensation. A Group Accident policy can provide benefits to students, officials and teachers for injuries sustained in the event of an accident. Subject to policy limits they can claim for non-Medicare medical expenses (e.g., physiotherapy, chiropractic, dental, etc), as well as…

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1 min
topp idea

ACCLAIMED choreographer Alice Topp has launched a new dance collective of independent artistic talent, called Project Animo, aimed at breathing new life into the Australian performing arts industry. Conceived as a platform for an ongoing exchange of ideas between dancers, choreographers and composers, Project Animo will present seasonal programs for audiences across Australia, starting with a premiere season in Melbourne, in November, 2021. The company will bring together newly retired and independent dancers who have previously performed with the country’s most eminent dance companies, as well as local composers and costume designers. Topp is currently a resident choreographer at the Australian Ballet and has created numerous award-winning works for both local and international companies. “Project Animo exists to give homegrown voices and talent a stage, and to share that abundance of creative…

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